Self Assessment

Exploring the key principles of Connected Learning, with specific attention to issues of equity, as demonstrated through weekly making, reflecting and sharing- my exploration was cemented with each week’s task and linking same back to the fundamental beliefs of connected learning.

Contributing regularly to our class discussions-contributed on a regular basis

Engaging with others (another community, students, colleagues, etc.) outside this course each week and sharing that work with us-I have collaborated and held discussions with colleagues, students, and fellow classmates. 

Documenting and reflecting on your journey in support of your own assessment and reflection-the blog adequately documents my journey

Create and share something to support your own work as well as others in thinking about connecting learning in equitable ways beyond the life of this course-I am proud of my final make, A Penny Harvest, and hope to turn plan into action next year. 

How well do you feel you met these expectations this semester?  I definitely feel I have met all course expectations

Where do you think you could have improved? I have a deeper understanding of the importance of seeking equity and allowing students to connect on a deeper level with themselves and each other. 

How do your successes and reflections on improvement inform your connected learning moving forward?  My reflections tell me how to not just talk about connected learning but to put into practice and now I have the tools to do so. I am also very inspired by my classmates’ levels of dedication to the same goals.

What else do you want me to consider when assessing your performance and participation over the past semester?  Just know how much I enjoyed this course, especially the hands on element using blogs, google hangout, etc., very enjoyable and worthwhile, thanks!

Self Assessment

Exploring the key principles of Connected Learning, with specific attention to issues of equity, as demonstrated through weekly making, reflecting and sharing- my exploration was cemented with each week’s task and linking same back to the fundamental beliefs of connected learning.

Contributing regularly to our class discussions-contributed on a regular basis

Engaging with others (another community, students, colleagues, etc.) outside this course each week and sharing that work with us-I have collaborated and held discussions with colleagues, students, and fellow classmates. 

Documenting and reflecting on your journey in support of your own assessment and reflection-the blog adequately documents my journey

Create and share something to support your own work as well as others in thinking about connecting learning in equitable ways beyond the life of this course-I am proud of my final make, A Penny Harvest, and hope to turn plan into action next year. 

How well do you feel you met these expectations this semester?  I definitely feel I have met all course expectations

Where do you think you could have improved? I have a deeper understanding of the importance of seeking equity and allowing students to connect on a deeper level with themselves and each other. 

How do your successes and reflections on improvement inform your connected learning moving forward?  My reflections tell me how to not just talk about connected learning but to put into practice and now I have the tools to do so. I am also very inspired by my classmates’ levels of dedication to the same goals.

What else do you want me to consider when assessing your performance and participation over the past semester?  Just know how much I enjoyed this course, especially the hands on element using blogs, google hangout, etc., very enjoyable and worthwhile, thanks!

Final Make & Inquiry Questions

My inquiry questions are listed below:

How can I assess for my students’ personal interests to ensure that opportunities for learning are student-interest centered?

In what ways can I incorporate connected learning practices into my 5th grade English/Writing curriculum?

What resources are available to me, i.e. technology/community outreach/literature, that will allow me to provide opportunities for my students to connect with each other, the world around them, with me, or with topics on a deeper level and reflect same in their writing?

The question listed in bold is the one that I centered my thinking around for my final make. In short, my final make ended up being something I discovered through my research on connected learning projects called a “Penny Harvest”. Basically, the students have a role in selecting local NPOs to raise money “pennies” for in order to support causes that they truly care about. It is certainly a student-driven project. 

By reviewing the PPT I created for my final make, I list all of the ways my students’ interests are collected and valued, thus establishing a shared purpose, interest driven learning experience. 

This certainly goes way beyond the bounds of Ed677 being this concept is supported by national organizations, such as the Young Philanthropists Organization. 

Final Make & Inquiry Questions

My inquiry questions are listed below:

How can I assess for my students’ personal interests to ensure that opportunities for learning are student-interest centered?

In what ways can I incorporate connected learning practices into my 5th grade English/Writing curriculum?

What resources are available to me, i.e. technology/community outreach/literature, that will allow me to provide opportunities for my students to connect with each other, the world around them, with me, or with topics on a deeper level and reflect same in their writing?

The question listed in bold is the one that I centered my thinking around for my final make. In short, my final make ended up being something I discovered through my research on connected learning projects called a “Penny Harvest”. Basically, the students have a role in selecting local NPOs to raise money “pennies” for in order to support causes that they truly care about. It is certainly a student-driven project. 

By reviewing the PPT I created for my final make, I list all of the ways my students’ interests are collected and valued, thus establishing a shared purpose, interest driven learning experience. 

This certainly goes way beyond the bounds of Ed677 being this concept is supported by national organizations, such as the Young Philanthropists Organization. 

F5F 4/15  Interviews on App

With the idea for my app in mind, I decided to interview a member of each audience, student, parent, and teacher, which would be involved.  Below are the questions I asked during my interviews:

Question 1: Have you ever used a QR code App before on a smart device? If not, would you be willing to learn how?

Question 2:  What are some ways that communication between parent and teacher outside of school be improved?

Question 3: What is your interpretation of the effectiveness and practicality of my idea for the “Couch Classroom” app?

Each response below is paraphrased.


Interview 1 (One of my 5th grade students)  

The student had not ever used a QR code reader and wasn’t exactly sure what a QR code was! When I showed one the child immediately recognized it and said that they had always wondered what those were for!  She explained she would absolutely want to know how to use QR codes. When asked about communicating with parents at home about assignments, she explained that sometimes she completely forgets how to do math problems and, when mom tries to help, she confuses her more!  When I mentioned a teacher being able to “virtually” appear to explain better, she thought it was “so cool”. After explaining the app, she showed excitement over the idea. She commented that not only would it help her, but it would help mom too, because sometimes mom doesn’t understand what she is saying when she is trying to explain the directions! Overall, she loved the idea. 

Interview 2 ( Colleague: 5th grade math teacher) 

The teacher had heard of QR codes but never used a code reader before. She was intrigued when I explained that it could have educational value. When asked about communication at home, she explained that she tries very hard to send worksheets home that demonstrate problem-solving skills for each topic because she understands the parent frustrations with “new math” concepts. However, even with examples as a guide, students come in the next day with work not done because they were confused or she receives an email from a parent explaining both the adult and child were lost at home working on it. After explaining the app, she said it sounded fabulous. Her only concerns were how to ensure QR codes are available when needed. Also, she is not familiar with screen casting and was unsure of how each teacher who is not “tech-savvy” would feel about the app.

Interview 3 (Colleague: Asked as a Parent)

My colleague and cooperating teacher has three children, 18, 15, and 13. She too had never used a QR code reader before, but has seen them often. She said that the majority of her communication is via email, and they attempt to tackle home assignments they best they can when working with her children. When I explained my idea for the app, she also said she could see how this could easily help struggling parents. She commented with all of the technology at our hands today, this would be a great way to open those lines of communication further and alleviate unneeded stress and confusion over home assignments. 

F5F 4/15  Interviews on App

With the idea for my app in mind, I decided to interview a member of each audience, student, parent, and teacher, which would be involved.  Below are the questions I asked during my interviews:

Question 1: Have you ever used a QR code App before on a smart device? If not, would you be willing to learn how?

Question 2:  What are some ways that communication between parent and teacher outside of school be improved?

Question 3: What is your interpretation of the effectiveness and practicality of my idea for the “Couch Classroom” app?

Each response below is paraphrased.


Interview 1 (One of my 5th grade students)  

The student had not ever used a QR code reader and wasn’t exactly sure what a QR code was! When I showed one the child immediately recognized it and said that they had always wondered what those were for!  She explained she would absolutely want to know how to use QR codes. When asked about communicating with parents at home about assignments, she explained that sometimes she completely forgets how to do math problems and, when mom tries to help, she confuses her more!  When I mentioned a teacher being able to “virtually” appear to explain better, she thought it was “so cool”. After explaining the app, she showed excitement over the idea. She commented that not only would it help her, but it would help mom too, because sometimes mom doesn’t understand what she is saying when she is trying to explain the directions! Overall, she loved the idea. 

Interview 2 ( Colleague: 5th grade math teacher) 

The teacher had heard of QR codes but never used a code reader before. She was intrigued when I explained that it could have educational value. When asked about communication at home, she explained that she tries very hard to send worksheets home that demonstrate problem-solving skills for each topic because she understands the parent frustrations with “new math” concepts. However, even with examples as a guide, students come in the next day with work not done because they were confused or she receives an email from a parent explaining both the adult and child were lost at home working on it. After explaining the app, she said it sounded fabulous. Her only concerns were how to ensure QR codes are available when needed. Also, she is not familiar with screen casting and was unsure of how each teacher who is not “tech-savvy” would feel about the app.

Interview 3 (Colleague: Asked as a Parent)

My colleague and cooperating teacher has three children, 18, 15, and 13. She too had never used a QR code reader before, but has seen them often. She said that the majority of her communication is via email, and they attempt to tackle home assignments they best they can when working with her children. When I explained my idea for the app, she also said she could see how this could easily help struggling parents. She commented with all of the technology at our hands today, this would be a great way to open those lines of communication further and alleviate unneeded stress and confusion over home assignments. 

“Couch Classroom” App!

Through the course of my studies, one technological tool I found to be practical and interesting are the uses of QR codes for educational purposes. I had completed assignments/projects in various courses, through which I realized just how many subject areas QR codes can apply to as well as to serve as resources for student-learning, parent-learning, and for a variety of learning opportunities. One project in particular I created was in conjunction with our district’s Every Day Math program. I created QR codes which would be 
“photocopied” onto each night’s lesson # home link worksheet. For both students and parents alike, either could scan the QR code and access a screen cast video of the teacher reviewing the big ideas of the day and/or demonstrating problem-solving for that skill. Even though I don’t teach math, I proposed this idea to members of the math department, and they absolutely loved it. Now, obviously QR code apps have already been invented, but I wanted to come up with an app that includes QR codes, screen casts, and subject content which allow teachers to communicate with parents and students virtually outside the boundaries of the classroom. 

     It is not a new concern that when students are completing assignments at home,  a common phrase parents hear is “I don’t know what to do.” In addition to the child’s struggle, parents who attempt help may find themselves in the same predicament! Therefore, the app, “Couch Classroom”, allows the parent and the child to create their regular home environments into a learning classroom. 

     The app would be a combination of a QR code scanner along with a homework planner of subjects. The app would be divided into the 5 subjects. Depending on which homework assignment additional clarification is needed, the parent and child may navigate to the respective classroom teacher.  For example, if the student is working on Math Unit 1, Homelink 1-12, an image will be located in the corner of the page, “Need Help?” By scanning the need help code for that particular assignment, a screen cast of the classroom teacher will appear on the smart-device, giving an overview of objectives, steps, big ideas, etc. 

       Of course, in order for this app to work effectively, all teachers would need to be on board to: shoot regular screen casts which cover content, and/or ensure that a “need help” code appears on documents either on worksheets or kept safely in the subject area of the student’s binder.  It’s fun to dream! 

“Couch Classroom” App!

Through the course of my studies, one technological tool I found to be practical and interesting are the uses of QR codes for educational purposes. I had completed assignments/projects in various courses, through which I realized just how many subject areas QR codes can apply to as well as to serve as resources for student-learning, parent-learning, and for a variety of learning opportunities. One project in particular I created was in conjunction with our district’s Every Day Math program. I created QR codes which would be 
“photocopied” onto each night’s lesson # home link worksheet. For both students and parents alike, either could scan the QR code and access a screen cast video of the teacher reviewing the big ideas of the day and/or demonstrating problem-solving for that skill. Even though I don’t teach math, I proposed this idea to members of the math department, and they absolutely loved it. Now, obviously QR code apps have already been invented, but I wanted to come up with an app that includes QR codes, screen casts, and subject content which allow teachers to communicate with parents and students virtually outside the boundaries of the classroom. 

     It is not a new concern that when students are completing assignments at home,  a common phrase parents hear is “I don’t know what to do.” In addition to the child’s struggle, parents who attempt help may find themselves in the same predicament! Therefore, the app, “Couch Classroom”, allows the parent and the child to create their regular home environments into a learning classroom. 

     The app would be a combination of a QR code scanner along with a homework planner of subjects. The app would be divided into the 5 subjects. Depending on which homework assignment additional clarification is needed, the parent and child may navigate to the respective classroom teacher.  For example, if the student is working on Math Unit 1, Homelink 1-12, an image will be located in the corner of the page, “Need Help?” By scanning the need help code for that particular assignment, a screen cast of the classroom teacher will appear on the smart-device, giving an overview of objectives, steps, big ideas, etc. 

       Of course, in order for this app to work effectively, all teachers would need to be on board to: shoot regular screen casts which cover content, and/or ensure that a “need help” code appears on documents either on worksheets or kept safely in the subject area of the student’s binder.  It’s fun to dream!