Find Six Saturdays

thewanderinggradstudent:

Aaaahhhh! I was so excited to see that this week is focused on the change we advocate and make based on our interests. It’s always especially inspiring when we see students taking action based off of an interest they have or a change they want to make in the world. I’ve included some resources below highlighting some youth stories I found impressive or deeply connected to. Since March is National Women’s Month, I’m making all of my finds about young women and their activism/change. This is my favorite Find Six Saturdays yet!

1. This young women was upset that her school didn’t supply adequate feminine products in her high school so she worked with a school club to make a change. Her change and calling out the stigma of menstruation caught the attention of a larger organization, who is now helping to supply underfunded high schools and shelters with feminine products. Read it here!

2. I couldn’t work on this resource list without including Emma Gonzales, whose interest in social justice became ignited when she watched her fellow classmates perish in the Parkland shooting. She turned the tragedy her school community faced into a call for gun reform and change. 

3. Amaryianna Copeny wrote a letter to President Obama in 2006 when she was 8-years-old in which she referred to herself as “Little Miss Flint.” In the letter she asked if she could meet with him or the First Lady during an upcoming trip to Washington, D.C. to talk about the water crisis in Flint, Michigan. 13 years later, Copeny has continued her fight for clean water in Flint and has also become a youth ambassador for the Women’s March.

4. In 2015, 13 year old Marley Dias was an avid reader and book lover. She decided to spread her passion for reading by founding a book campaign. Dias is the founder of #1000blackgirlbooks, with the goal to collect and donate 1,000 books to her peers that featured black girls as the main characters.To date, she has collected more than 10,000 books and spoke alongside Michelle Obama and Oprah Winfrey at the United State of Women Summit in 2016. This past January, she released her own book, Marley Dias Gets it Done: And So Can You! ” which features opening remarks and praise from Hillary Clinton, Ellen DeGeneres and filmmaker Ava DuVernay. Her work has also earned her a spot as the youngest person on Forbes’ 2018 30 under 30 list.

5. Two young sisters named Melati and Isabel were passionate about the environment and ways they could make change. At ages 10 & 12, the girls founded their own company called Bye,Bye Plastic Bags. Their goal was to spread awareness about reusable bags and to design fashionable reusable bags to better the environment. 

6. Katie Eder was a young woman who loved being fit and speaking out for change. She combined her passions by becoming an executive director of 50 Miles More. Her activism is encouraging other young people to speak up. Inspired by the 54-mile Selma to Montgomery marches of the Civil Rights Movement, 50 Miles More began with a four-day, 50-mile march from Madison to Janesville, Wisconsin, the home of House Speaker Paul Ryan, who has blocked gun reform legislation time and time again.Eder’s mission is to make sure teens know that their voices are important and influential. She’s also a founding member of Future Coalition, which organized Walkout to Vote, the nationwide school walkout that encouraged young people to march to the polls on election day. Her activism dates to when she was 13 and founded Kids Tales, an initiative promoting creative writing among young people across the United States.

Lovely curation of work/action by youth by a @arcadiasoe #ED677 -er this week.

Find Six Saturdays

thewanderinggradstudent:

Aaaahhhh! I was so excited to see that this week is focused on the change we advocate and make based on our interests. It’s always especially inspiring when we see students taking action based off of an interest they have or a change they want to make in the world. I’ve included some resources below highlighting some youth stories I found impressive or deeply connected to. Since March is National Women’s Month, I’m making all of my finds about young women and their activism/change. This is my favorite Find Six Saturdays yet!

1. This young women was upset that her school didn’t supply adequate feminine products in her high school so she worked with a school club to make a change. Her change and calling out the stigma of menstruation caught the attention of a larger organization, who is now helping to supply underfunded high schools and shelters with feminine products. Read it here!

2. I couldn’t work on this resource list without including Emma Gonzales, whose interest in social justice became ignited when she watched her fellow classmates perish in the Parkland shooting. She turned the tragedy her school community faced into a call for gun reform and change. 

3. Amaryianna Copeny wrote a letter to President Obama in 2006 when she was 8-years-old in which she referred to herself as “Little Miss Flint.” In the letter she asked if she could meet with him or the First Lady during an upcoming trip to Washington, D.C. to talk about the water crisis in Flint, Michigan. 13 years later, Copeny has continued her fight for clean water in Flint and has also become a youth ambassador for the Women’s March.

4. In 2015, 13 year old Marley Dias was an avid reader and book lover. She decided to spread her passion for reading by founding a book campaign. Dias is the founder of #1000blackgirlbooks, with the goal to collect and donate 1,000 books to her peers that featured black girls as the main characters.To date, she has collected more than 10,000 books and spoke alongside Michelle Obama and Oprah Winfrey at the United State of Women Summit in 2016. This past January, she released her own book, Marley Dias Gets it Done: And So Can You! ” which features opening remarks and praise from Hillary Clinton, Ellen DeGeneres and filmmaker Ava DuVernay. Her work has also earned her a spot as the youngest person on Forbes’ 2018 30 under 30 list.

5. Two young sisters named Melati and Isabel were passionate about the environment and ways they could make change. At ages 10 & 12, the girls founded their own company called Bye,Bye Plastic Bags. Their goal was to spread awareness about reusable bags and to design fashionable reusable bags to better the environment. 

6. Katie Eder was a young woman who loved being fit and speaking out for change. She combined her passions by becoming an executive director of 50 Miles More. Her activism is encouraging other young people to speak up. Inspired by the 54-mile Selma to Montgomery marches of the Civil Rights Movement, 50 Miles More began with a four-day, 50-mile march from Madison to Janesville, Wisconsin, the home of House Speaker Paul Ryan, who has blocked gun reform legislation time and time again.Eder’s mission is to make sure teens know that their voices are important and influential. She’s also a founding member of Future Coalition, which organized Walkout to Vote, the nationwide school walkout that encouraged young people to march to the polls on election day. Her activism dates to when she was 13 and founded Kids Tales, an initiative promoting creative writing among young people across the United States.

Lovely curation of work/action by youth by a @arcadiasoe #ED677 -er this week.

Experiments continue re: Connected Assessment

Over 9 months ago I was reflecting on the ways that I was wobbling around assessment in my ED677 course at Arcadia University. Today I am going back to this work to look at what we all learned and how I might apply this learning to ED677 Spring 2019 as well as a new course that I am developing for Hopkins called Teaching Writing Online (to run Summer 2019).

Here’s how I designed things for ED677: Since the overall goal of ED677 is for each of us to design with the values of Connected Learning in mind, ie. social, participatory and equitable while also paying attention to the ways this impacts our teaching. These are abstract concepts of course, so as the instructor I tried to support thinking through them by offering a set of set of continua that moves us in increasingly connected directions, ie. reflecting on learning, reflecting on teaching, and then reflecting on our practice.

To do this I offered three guides:

Reflecting on Learning, meant to support participants to reflect and assess on their own learning. 

Reflecting on Teaching, meant to support participants to reflect on the impacts this learning might have on their teaching. 

Reflecting on Practice, meant to support participants to think about the ways they are practicing being a connected learning and teacher at ED677 with and identify where they have had success as well as where you would like to improve and then set goals for next steps.

I then asked them to do a Self Assessment and offered some questions they could respond to (they were prompted to do this both mid-semester and at the end) and also, if these choose, to send me (anonymous) Instructor Feedback.

Here are the guides we used:


Reflecting on Learning Guide
As a learner practicing connected learning, where do you think you are along these continuum -  Where did start? Where are you now? Where might be you be tomorrow?

X Axis = Continuum of More Connected to Less Connected
Y Axis = Values of Connected Learning

Y, Social

  • Socializing to learn is avoided.
  • Socializing to learn starts to happen.
  • Socializing to learn is embraced.
  • Socializing to learn is fostered in self and others.

Y, Equitable

  • Learning resources and opportunities are controlled by those in power and not distributed equitably.
  • Learning resources and opportunities are controlled by those in power but distributed more equitably.
  • Learning resources and opportunities are shared and distributed equitably.
  • There is shared responsibility for the creation and distribution of learning resources and opportunities.

Y, Participatory

  • Participation is based on notions of compliance (ie. mandates and expectations of others).
  • Participation is based on interests although mostly driven by mandates and expectations of others.
  • Participation is based on interests and a sense of value to the larger community.
  • Participation is based on interests and a shared sense of value to and from community.

Reflecting on Teaching Guide

As a teacher asking questions about equity and connected learning, where do you think you are between these descriptions of conventional versus connected teaching? Where do you want to be? (This is a resource created by Nicole Mirra in her collection Transitioning from Conventional to Connected Teaching: Small Moves and Radical Acts)

image

Reflecting on Practice Recommendations

At ED677 I recommend that you practice and explore the connected teaching and learning ideas above in these ways:

  • Explore the key principles of Connected Learning, with specific attention to issues of equity, and demonstrate these through weekly making, reflecting and sharing.
  • Contribute regularly online and to the work of your fellow classmates.
  • Engage with others (another community, students, colleagues, etc.) outside this course.
  • Document and reflect on your journey in support of your own assessment and evaluation.
  • Create and share something to support your work as well as others in thinking about connecting learning in equitable ways beyond the life of this course.

Look back at your work so far. How has your practice been going? Where do you feel you have been successful? What do you think you could improve?


Finally a set of self-assessment questions were offered to impact a final assessment grade for this course and reflection on goals forward. Self-assessments were not meant to be publicly shared unless participants chose to do so; it was a requirement to share at least this part of their assessment with me as the instructor.

  1. In what ways have you been successful this semester?
  2. In what ways do you still want to improve?
  3. How do your successes and reflections on improvement inform your thoughts and questions about connected learning and teaching moving forward?
  4. What are your goals forward?

From there, I reviewed and responded each self-assessment and the related work for the semester and sent back a response to each participant. I created a corresponding grade for Arcadia University. As per my original syllabus, I had said that for those registered and seeking credit, grades will be based on your own self-assessment and instructor assessment (70/30). I said that instructor assessment would be based on:

  • Active and regular engagement with classmates and colleagues around the concepts of connected learning;
  • Reflection on your own learning and the implications of connected learning principles and values;
  • The completion of a final self-assessment and final public project.

Having now completed that semester, a few reflections I want to jot down include:

  1. Self-assessments were strong this semester and I found them useful in determining a final grade. Participants (only 4 of 13 opted to give instructor feedback) gave positive feedback overall; they did not directly speak to the assessment however.
  2. These two instructor assessment feel valid to me still as they were very clear throughout: 
    1. Reflection on your own learning and the implications of connected learning principles and values;
    2. The completion of a final self-assessment and final public project.
  3. This one still feels very unsolid, fuzzy: ie. “Active and regular engagement with classmates and colleagues around the concepts of connected learning.” The question of what is “active” and “regular” in my mind versus theirs if I don’t give exact instructions on it is the core problem. And I don’t give exact instruction because all of our lives are different and needs and approaches to engagement are different for every person. I think that it actually ended up getting better addressed in the self-assessment because I focused on the “practice recommendations” that I offered at the beginning of this course.

Wobble, wobble, wobble. Some flow. Then wobble, wobble, wobble, again. And I’m still excited about what I am learning here.

ps. Note added that I think the continuum re: learning could use some discussion. For example, I have no idea if the continuum is right for really important and complex issues such as equity and participatory. Even social for that matter; what’s it mean? Anyway … an area that needs a real look at too that I realized after posting this.

Experiments continue re: Connected Assessment

Over 9 months ago I was reflecting on the ways that I was wobbling around assessment in my ED677 course at Arcadia University. Today I am going back to this work to look at what we all learned and how I might apply this learning to ED677 Spring 2019 as well as a new course that I am developing for Hopkins called Teaching Writing Online (to run Summer 2019).

Here’s how I designed things for ED677: Since the overall goal of ED677 is for each of us to design with the values of Connected Learning in mind, ie. social, participatory and equitable while also paying attention to the ways this impacts our teaching. These are abstract concepts of course, so as the instructor I tried to support thinking through them by offering a set of set of continua that moves us in increasingly connected directions, ie. reflecting on learning, reflecting on teaching, and then reflecting on our practice.

To do this I offered three guides:

Reflecting on Learning, meant to support participants to reflect and assess on their own learning. 

Reflecting on Teaching, meant to support participants to reflect on the impacts this learning might have on their teaching. 

Reflecting on Practice, meant to support participants to think about the ways they are practicing being a connected learning and teacher at ED677 with and identify where they have had success as well as where you would like to improve and then set goals for next steps.

I then asked them to do a Self Assessment and offered some questions they could respond to (they were prompted to do this both mid-semester and at the end) and also, if these choose, to send me (anonymous) Instructor Feedback.

Here are the guides we used:


Reflecting on Learning Guide
As a learner practicing connected learning, where do you think you are along these continuum -  Where did start? Where are you now? Where might be you be tomorrow?

X Axis = Continuum of More Connected to Less Connected
Y Axis = Values of Connected Learning

Y, Social

  • Socializing to learn is avoided.
  • Socializing to learn starts to happen.
  • Socializing to learn is embraced.
  • Socializing to learn is fostered in self and others.

Y, Equitable

  • Learning resources and opportunities are controlled by those in power and not distributed equitably.
  • Learning resources and opportunities are controlled by those in power but distributed more equitably.
  • Learning resources and opportunities are shared and distributed equitably.
  • There is shared responsibility for the creation and distribution of learning resources and opportunities.

Y, Participatory

  • Participation is based on notions of compliance (ie. mandates and expectations of others).
  • Participation is based on interests although mostly driven by mandates and expectations of others.
  • Participation is based on interests and a sense of value to the larger community.
  • Participation is based on interests and a shared sense of value to and from community.

Reflecting on Teaching Guide

As a teacher asking questions about equity and connected learning, where do you think you are between these descriptions of conventional versus connected teaching? Where do you want to be? (This is a resource created by Nicole Mirra in her collection Transitioning from Conventional to Connected Teaching: Small Moves and Radical Acts)

image

Reflecting on Practice Recommendations

At ED677 I recommend that you practice and explore the connected teaching and learning ideas above in these ways:

  • Explore the key principles of Connected Learning, with specific attention to issues of equity, and demonstrate these through weekly making, reflecting and sharing.
  • Contribute regularly online and to the work of your fellow classmates.
  • Engage with others (another community, students, colleagues, etc.) outside this course.
  • Document and reflect on your journey in support of your own assessment and evaluation.
  • Create and share something to support your work as well as others in thinking about connecting learning in equitable ways beyond the life of this course.

Look back at your work so far. How has your practice been going? Where do you feel you have been successful? What do you think you could improve?


Finally a set of self-assessment questions were offered to impact a final assessment grade for this course and reflection on goals forward. Self-assessments were not meant to be publicly shared unless participants chose to do so; it was a requirement to share at least this part of their assessment with me as the instructor.

  1. In what ways have you been successful this semester?
  2. In what ways do you still want to improve?
  3. How do your successes and reflections on improvement inform your thoughts and questions about connected learning and teaching moving forward?
  4. What are your goals forward?

From there, I reviewed and responded each self-assessment and the related work for the semester and sent back a response to each participant. I created a corresponding grade for Arcadia University. As per my original syllabus, I had said that for those registered and seeking credit, grades will be based on your own self-assessment and instructor assessment (70/30). I said that instructor assessment would be based on:

  • Active and regular engagement with classmates and colleagues around the concepts of connected learning;
  • Reflection on your own learning and the implications of connected learning principles and values;
  • The completion of a final self-assessment and final public project.

Having now completed that semester, a few reflections I want to jot down include:

  1. Self-assessments were strong this semester and I found them useful in determining a final grade. Participants (only 4 of 13 opted to give instructor feedback) gave positive feedback overall; they did not directly speak to the assessment however.
  2. These two instructor assessment feel valid to me still as they were very clear throughout: 
    1. Reflection on your own learning and the implications of connected learning principles and values;
    2. The completion of a final self-assessment and final public project.
  3. This one still feels very unsolid, fuzzy: ie. “Active and regular engagement with classmates and colleagues around the concepts of connected learning.” The question of what is “active” and “regular” in my mind versus theirs if I don’t give exact instructions on it is the core problem. And I don’t give exact instruction because all of our lives are different and needs and approaches to engagement are different for every person. I think that it actually ended up getting better addressed in the self-assessment because I focused on the “practice recommendations” that I offered at the beginning of this course.

Wobble, wobble, wobble. Some flow. Then wobble, wobble, wobble, again. And I’m still excited about what I am learning here.

ps. Note added that I think the continuum re: learning could use some discussion. For example, I have no idea if the continuum is right for really important and complex issues such as equity and participatory. Even social for that matter; what’s it mean? Anyway … an area that needs a real look at too that I realized after posting this.

Making #The4thBox @ #educon #ED677

For a few years now I’ve been teaching ED677, an online course at Arcadia University called Seeking Equity in Connected Learning and Teaching. My intention in the course is to support educators in exploring connected practices in their own learning and teaching, and in doing so, think together about the core issues of equity in our work and build toward it with/for our learners.

While we continue to seek equity, after 4 years I really do have to stand back and wonder, are we actually getting anywhere? It’s a hard question because really, it’s a much bigger job than any single course could impact. And it’s a hard question, because as the instructor, I’m not even sure what I am expecting to see. And this is also why we keep seeking it, year after year. And try to figure this out together.

I see a lot of interesting work in their final projects (will post a link in a bit to a curated set of these) but I wanted to first write about something we did along the way this year which was new. And I think significant.

During the 3rd week of ED677 we focus specifically on imagining what we mean by equity as a means of starting that conversation which then threads throughout the semester. This year we had a range of readings/watchings to frame what we were thinking about, and then because we always include the opportunity to make something each week, this time around I recommended #The4thBox project by the Center For Story-based Strategy and Interaction Institute for Social Change.

The week’s make was meant to support us in imagining how we might get into this fight for equity. We used an alternative image/remix of a popular equality/equity graphic and meme and then followed the questions and prompts created by the Center, ie:

Use the 4th box to discuss the importance of not just telling a different version of the same story, but of actually changing the story (by challenging assumptions).

Questions include:

What other story could be revealed in this setting?

What other “psychic break” could you make up?

What other underlying assumption here could you challenge?

Who built that wall in the first place and/or who took it away?

Before I did this online with ED677, however, I also facilitated a “conversation” that incorporated this activity at Educon 2018 alongside some previous participants of ED677. Here are the slides we used – at the workshop we prompted the discussion in much the same way; however we followed up that activity with small group work and discussion.


image
image
image
image

A few pictures from the face to face work at EduCon 2018.


Doing this activity both in person as well as online, I found it to be remarkably effective in supporting the kind of conversation I was hoping would emerge – and helped me get clear on what I was even looking for. First, I found it supported us in engaging physically as well as intellectually with the idea of equity – in the face to face setting, it was the first thing we did together as a group of mostly strangers, and it supported spontaneous conversations at the table as well as a sort of shared nervousness and anticipation about what the 4th box should be. Online, it was less initially collaborative as each individual made their own 4th box on their own (I had set up a specific discussion for them to share about this work as they did it, but no one used it) – however, the discussions about what we made and why continued throughout the semester, showing up in their shared blogs, collaborative work, and in their final projects. I attribute this staying power to the physical and creative nature of the activity – I could see how it resonated in a way that our general readings, discussions, and blog posts don’t (well, except when we use Hypothes.is to annotate … which is an interesting parallel but maybe also be a slightly different blog post.)

Second, I found that this activity supported a range of 4th boxes to be created and that was exciting to me. There wasn’t just one approach to equity, not just one reason that things are inequitable, and no one external reason to blame. The first group we did it with was dominated by educators who, for the most part, I believe are used to talking about equity more frequently – the second group, in ED677, seemed to me to be more dominated by educators who are maybe less frequently engaged in such conversations. And yet, in both situations, the complexities of supporting equity were evident, as were its approaches and solutions. I also saw, and continue to see in ED677, educators putting themselves firmly into the equation.

Below are a few examples of what we came up with, individually, in ED677. And in this collaborative presentation we made, you’ll see the theme’s continuation through to the end of the semester which shows its resonance.


image

Read more: Equity with a Twist


image

Read more: #The4thBox … Collaboration


image

Read more: Participation


image

Read more: My Fourth Box


image

Read more: Equality vs. Equity


image

Read more: How Can We Hit it Out Of the Park?


image

Read more: The 4th Box


I want to thank the Center For Story-based Strategy and Interaction Institute for Social Change for the creation of this activity set and the opportunity to begin and foster essential conversations in support of creating equity together. 

Making #The4thBox @ #educon #ED677

For a few years now I’ve been teaching ED677, an online course at Arcadia University called Seeking Equity in Connected Learning and Teaching. My intention in the course is to support educators in exploring connected practices in their own learning and teaching, and in doing so, think together about the core issues of equity in our work and build toward it with/for our learners.

While we continue to seek equity, after 4 years I really do have to stand back and wonder, are we actually getting anywhere? It’s a hard question because really, it’s a much bigger job than any single course could impact. And it’s a hard question, because as the instructor, I’m not even sure what I am expecting to see. And this is also why we keep seeking it, year after year. And try to figure this out together.

I see a lot of interesting work in their final projects (will post a link in a bit to a curated set of these) but I wanted to first write about something we did along the way this year which was new. And I think significant.

During the 3rd week of ED677 we focus specifically on imagining what we mean by equity as a means of starting that conversation which then threads throughout the semester. This year we had a range of readings/watchings to frame what we were thinking about (several of them new, including a conversation from @educon​ which I thought was impactful). And then, because we always include the opportunity to make something each week, this time around I recommended #The4thBox project by the Center For Story-based Strategy and Interaction Institute for Social Change.

The week’s make was meant to support us in imagining how we might get into this fight for equity. We used an alternative image/remix of a popular equality/equity graphic and meme and then followed the questions and prompts created  by the Center, ie:

Use it to discuss the importance of not just telling a different version of the same story, but of actually changing the story (by challenging assumptions). Questions from this project include:

What other story could be revealed in this setting?

What other “psychic break” could you make up?

What other underlying assumption here could you challenge?

Who built that wall in the first place and/or who took it away?

Before I did this online with ED677, however, I also facilitated a “conversation” that incorporated this at Educon 2018 alongside some previous participants of ED677. Here are the slides we used – at the workshop we prompted the discussion in much the same way as I did online; however we followed up that activity with small group work and discussion.

image
image
image
image

A few pictures from the face to face work at EduCon 2018.


Doing this activity both in person as well as online, I found it to be remarkably effective in supporting the kind of conversation I was hoping would emerge – and helped me get clear on what I was even looking for. First, I found it supported us in engaging physically as well as intellectually with the idea of equity – the the face to face setting, it was the first thing we did together as a group of mostly strangers, and it supported spontaneous conversations at the table as well as a sort of shared nervousness and anticipation about what we were creating and what the 4th box should be. Online, it was less initially collaborative as each individual made their own 4th box on their own (I had set up a specific discussion for them to share about this work as they did it, but no one used it) – however, the discussions about what we made and why continued throughout the semester, showing up in their shared blogs, collaborative work, and in their final projects. I also attribute this staying power to the physical and creative nature of the activity – I could see how it resonated in a way that our general readings, discussions, and blog posts don’t (well, except when we use Hypothes.is to annotate … which is an interesting parallel but maybe also a slightly different blog post.)

Second, I found that this activity supported a range of 4th boxes to be created and that was exciting to me. There wasn’t just one approach to equity, not just one reason that things are inequitable, and no one external person or entity to blame. The first group we did it with was dominated by educators who, for the most part, I believe are used to talking about equity more frequently – the second group, in ED677, seemed to me to be more dominated by educators who are maybe less frequently engaged in such conversations. And yet, in both situations, the complexities of supporting equity were evident, as were its approaches and solutions. I also saw, and continue to see in ED677, educators putting themselves firmly into the equation.

Below are a few examples of what we came up with, individually, in ED677. And in this collaborative presentation we made, you’ll see the theme’s continuation through to the end of the semester.

image

Equity with a Twist


image

#The4thBox … Collaboration


image

Participation


image

My Fourth Box


image

Equality vs. Equity


image

How Can We Hit it Out Of the Park?


image

The 4th Box


I want to thank the Center For Story-based Strategy and Interaction Institute for Social Change for the creation of this activity set and for creating this opportunity to begin essential conversations in support of creating equity together. 

Day #6, Data Detox

Getting back to this after a weekend break and did a quick #datadetox today; good resources to return back to do more. First question was how may Apps do I have on my phone … so I counted. 

141! Yikes.

According to the Data Detox Tactical Collective, I have very high exposure to data collection, ie. “The more apps you have, the more your data builds up, and the more companies have access to it.”

So my first challenge was to delete the ones that I don’t use anymore. I now have about 1/3 of what I did and I need to do a bit more. But it’s a good start and the phone feels so much lighter!

The second challenge is to adjust my privacy settings on my phone which I’d already kind of done. Finally I was introduced to the Alternative App Centre where I can find many apps that do what my apps may do but these don’t collect information. Very cool.

I already have and semi-use one of these; Signal. It encrypts text messages. I downloaded it after the last election. Find me at seecantrill there.

Day #6, Data Detox

Getting back to this after a weekend break and did a quick #datadetox today; good resources to return back to do more. First question was how may Apps do I have on my phone … so I counted. 

141! Yikes.

According to the Data Detox Tactical Collective, I have very high exposure to data collection, ie. “The more apps you have, the more your data builds up, and the more companies have access to it.”

So my first challenge was to delete the ones that I don’t use anymore. I now have about 1/3 of what I did and I need to do a bit more. But it’s a good start and the phone feels so much lighter!

The second challenge is to adjust my privacy settings on my phone which I’d already kind of done. Finally I was introduced to the Alternative App Centre where I can find many apps that do what my apps may do but these don’t collect information. Very cool.

I already have and semi-use one of these; Signal. It encrypts text messages. I downloaded it after the last election. Find me at seecantrill there.

Day #6, Data Detox

Getting back to this after a weekend break and did a quick #datadetox today; good resources to return back to do more. First question was how may Apps do I have on my phone … so I counted. 

141! Yikes.

According to the Data Detox Tactical Collective, I have very high exposure to data collection, ie. “The more apps you have, the more your data builds up, and the more companies have access to it.”

So my first challenge was to delete the ones that I don’t use anymore. I now have about 1/3 of what I did and I need to do a bit more. But it’s a good start and the phone feels so much lighter!

The second challenge is to adjust my privacy settings on my phone which I’d already kind of done. Finally I was introduced to the Alternative App Centre where I can find many apps that do what my apps may do but these don’t collect information. Very cool.

I already have and semi-use one of these; Signal. It encrypts text messages. I downloaded it after the last election. Find me at seecantrill there.

Day #5, Data Detox

Day #5 is pretty rad and all about your phone and the #infosphere around us. I downloaded The Architecture of Radio which shows me these photos of what is around me in terms of a info systems, etc. In these screenshots you can see that there are a lot of cell towers, wifi (oops, less captured here, but I could see them too), GPS, other satellites (US, Russia, Direct TV). I am also sharing my direct location at this time so I erased that part out … don’t want to toxify things while I detox!

I can’t help but wonder what all this does to our brains and to the larger ecosystem/biosphere; not to mention all the space things/space junk floating around this planet. 

My other favorite part was the simple act of renaming my phone. It’s now named “Marcy the Cat has beautiful green eyes” just because that makes me happy to might make others happy too.

Here is Marcy the Cat btw: